TumbiSapichu
  • Member for 3 years, 9 months
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Understanding ancestry testing mathematically
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6 votes

I'll give here a simple, non-technical answer because I'm assuming you don't need to actually perform an analysis of ancestry. So, detecting ancestry is a non-trivial task. Given your genome ...

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Are there limits to drug resistance?
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5 votes

There are physical limits to the existance of life forms, wether temperature, pressure, osmolarity, etc. But these are usually physicochemical fields acting over a wide spatial structure. In the case ...

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Where does the number 67 in the nuclear protein/antigen Ki-67 come from? Why not 66 or 68?
5 votes

From Wikipedia: "The name is derived from the city of origin (Kiel, Germany) and the number of the original clone in the 96-well plate".

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The role of duration of infectiousness in SIR models
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3 votes

My question concerns the way that $d$ enters the SIR model, because I find it not so plausible: to consider all persons that are infected today and take a fraction $ν$ of them that will have ...

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Are there any "thermotroph" lifeforms?
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3 votes

No, because temperature is a quantity related to the motion of molecules (or particles) in an ensemble (thus, kinetic energy) but such motion does not have a mechanism to transduce it into some form ...

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How did plaques form in Salvador Luria's Bacteriophage experiment (discovery of restriction enzymes)?
3 votes

This indeed a very interesting experiment. In the lecture, you can see that the obvious explanation for the initial inhability to grow in strain B indicates that the bacteria is resistant to the virus....

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Are specific primers or detectors, or both, used in COVID-19 tests?
2 votes

When you run a PCR reaction, you are making copies of a DNA sequence of interest (cDNA in case of retrotranscription, since retrovirus have RNA as the genetic material). The sequence of interest is ...

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what are the factors that can be used to compute the probability of getting the coronavirus?
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2 votes

I'd refer you to a couple of papers in Lancet, here and here. They, in fact, have a mathematical treatment of this very question, and in the supplementary material they list some parameters that might ...

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Why does protein folding not depend on the order in which it is synthesized?
2 votes

In addition to what is already said, I want to mention something more subtle. What other people have commented here is about an old 'dogma' due to Christian Anfinsen, which postulates that all that ...

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DNA Inheritance- Math vs. Biology
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2 votes

So, at core (it seems) you are interested in the rate of recombination events and the magnitud of their occurrences. This would be the only source I can think of that would give you information about ...

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Which proteins are most sensitive to electric fields?
2 votes

There are various proteins sensitive to changes in electric field. More precisely, they are activated by changes in voltage (surrounding the protein), and immersed in water, as all cells are mainly ...

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Can something like McDonalds be considered a life form?
2 votes

No. First of all, an "organism" is not automatically a "life form". And it is easy to see that McDonald's does not have an information repository in the form of a genome-like structure, where ...

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Technologies that rely on evolution
1 votes

Evolution is not the type of theory that is mainly directed towards technological applications, as opposed to many physical theories. It is a principle to understand living systems, from the simplest ...

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Making new antibodies
1 votes

There are plenty of papers with models for this. For instance, check a few hundred here. Edit: I'm not an expert in modeling these particular processes. However, I do know about mathematical models ...

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What was the evolutionary benefit of enclosing hemoglobin in cells?
1 votes

If you enclose the globin in a cell you can achieve a high concentration of the globin, which makes for a faster, readily usable pool available, and it is not subject to degradation (via proteases, or ...

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Why don't carrier proteins require energy to change shape?
1 votes

The carrier proteins that participate in passive transport do not require energy in the form of ATP molecules, which is the primary form of metabolic energy of the cell, but this does not mean that ...

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Are there COVID-19 citizen science projects to compare habits and outcomes?
1 votes

I think you are looking for a very specific design of 'citizen' projects. But, if we relax a bit your criteria, there are some examples. Here, and here, for instance. One worth discussing, I think, is ...

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Are ligand gated channels saturable?
1 votes

Yes, they are saturable, because they have a finite number of 'binding sites', depending on the particular example you are looking at. Then, once they join the substrate to be transported, they need ...

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What is the meaning of a selection regime in this context?
1 votes

I'm an evolutionary biologist. When someone says "selection regime" they simply mean the general conditions (environmental, ecological, etc.) that could have produced a particular evolutionary outcome....

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Dynamic of the number of cells over time as the embryo grows
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1 votes

There are some interesting analyses in mice, zebrafish, and worms. These papers contain a lot of data at the single-cell resolution, so you'll need to read and find the exact numbers about cell counts ...

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SARS-CoV-2 proteome: is the SPIKE protein not an issue for a hospitalized patient?
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1 votes

It is always a problem. "The virus" is not a single particle that only needs to enter a single cell, a single time. It is a population of millions of viral particles, that infect millions of cells. So,...

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L-system rule for different plant types
1 votes

There are many good papers by Karl J. Niklas where he models tree growth. I'm not sure if he used L-systems in particular, but I'm sure his work can inform you about the 'rules'. You can find out more ...

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Sleep deprivation relation to growth rate and mental health in adolescence
1 votes

A couple of papers (from the same group, it seems) defines sleep deprivation in adolescents as less than 6hr of sleep within a month. They found that sleep deprivation increases health risks, ...

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Nature versus nurture regarding aggression in specific dog breeds
1 votes

It seems that there are some important differences in dog aggression depending on the dog breed (towards strangers, owners, and other dogs): That being said, it seems that a significant proportion of ...

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What function does a mane serve in animals that possess it?
1 votes

I am not aware of the evolutionary advantage of the mane in the animals that you mention. In fact, the only reference I could find talks about a predator, not a prey, and thus it might indicate that ...

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Is the missing "life-ingredient" in today's Earth's existence the reason why we cannot recreate life?
1 votes

This is really quite a question. And many leading biologists have tried (very hard) to answer it. In my opinion, most of our incapacity to study which conditions can favor some form of "life" is due ...

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Flow cytometric counting of apoptotic adhering cells
1 votes

Here some resources, Cell harvesting effects on Annexin V staining. Protocol for apoptotic analysis using Annexin V. Quite a long discussion about this issue. Another protocol. Cheers, Pedro

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How close are we to having phages take over the role of infection control from antibiotics? What developments need to occur?
1 votes

This is a very interesting topic. Indeed, historically, it might seem that "phage therapy" research is in a dormant state. But there are some groups actively doing theoretical research on the synergy ...

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What is the disadvantage of circular DNA?
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0 votes

Per se, there is no disadvantage of one type of DNA over the other. They evolved for different reasons, and the fact that both are still present indicates that they fulfill their role(s) ...

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How can I classify the 3 clades(S, G, V) of the coronavirus that are found on GISAID?
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*The question is a duplicate of this one. There are many techniques, all encompassed in what is known as molecular phylogenetics. To get 'clades' or any other groups, you need the sequences of your ...

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