jarlemag
  • Member for 7 years, 11 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
  • Oslo, Norway
Detecting food fraud
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5 votes

There are several ways you could go about identifying species through DNA. If you want to do everything yourself, the simplest option in terms of equipment needed consists of evaluating fragment ...

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Can a neuron make a synapse onto itself?
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14 votes

A synapse from a neuron unto itself is called an Autapse. Not a whole lot is known about them. Tamas et al. (1) give a summary: Van der Loos and Glaser (1972)proposed the word “autapse” to describe ...

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Could super-caffeinating somebody's bloodstream be dangerous?
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6 votes

In extreme doses, caffeine can - like almost any substance - cause death. Wikipedia has this to say on the subject: Extreme overdose can result in death.[59][60] The median lethal dose (LD50) ...

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How is the transcription direction of RNA polymerase determined?
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3 votes

Transcription always proceeds in the direction 5' (5-prime) to 3' (3-prime) on the coding strand of DNA. Binding of both transcription factors and RNA polymerase to DNA depends on sequence motifs in ...

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How are oranges in the US or anywhere made seedless?
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3 votes

Oranges and other fruits are generally not actively made seedless. Rather, seeds may fail to develop due to either lack of fertilization (pollination) or a natural tendency. The natural production of ...

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Can human survive falling from 30,000 ft without a chute?
9 votes

Summary: A fall from "any height" may be survivable, depending on what you hit, but with an expectation of severe injuries. A water impact at terminal velocity will in all likelyhood result in ...

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Advantage of cup-like shape of blood cells, spores?
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3 votes

The functional implications of the biconcave shape of human red blood cells are not fully understood. Several hypotheses have been suggested as explanations, including bending energy (1) and effects ...

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Why doesn't the cytosol dissolve the polar structures?
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4 votes

Many cell components are not simply hydrophobic or hydrophilic, but have dual affinities. Proteins typically have structures which result in the interior of the protein being hydrophobic and the ...

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Why is oxygen used up in eutrophication?
2 votes

As you surmise, the oxygen is consumed by decomposers. From the Wikipedia page on Eutrophication: Phosphorus is a necessary nutrient for plants to live, and is the limiting factor for plant ...

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Gel Electrophoresis - loading dye and more
1 votes

When using small sample volumes, it is advisable to use water to increase the volume and make handling and mixing with loading dye easier. For example, you may mix 2 uL of your sample with 1 uL 6X ...

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What does "kcal/mol" mean when speaking of enzyme catalysis?
2 votes

The activation energy for a reaction is given for a given extent of reaction, typically per mole of product formed. In general, the amount of enzyme present in the reactor is irrelevant with respect ...

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List of heritability estimates in humans?
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3 votes

You may consider consulting the H2DB database. The database is quite new, so the number of heritability estimates is not very high at the moment (currently 225 estimates for human, 838 estimates in ...

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Detecting a Fasting State in the Body via Lasers
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3 votes

If by a fasting state, you mean blood glucose levels, researchers seem to think it is feasible. See for example Pleitez et al. (1) and Guo et al. (2). Their designs both utilize infrared IR laser ...

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How are new chromosomes replicated into the next generation via sexual reproduction?
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1 votes

You are right that a person with an abnormal number of chromosomes will be unlikely to find an "equal" partner to mate with. This does not prevent a chromosome aberration from spreading though, and it ...

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Effect of nerve pills and relationship to Shingles
1 votes

I gather you are talking about anti-axiety drugs (anxiolytics). Benzodiazepines is one of the major groups of anxiolytics, and includes Xanax. Benzodiazepines are central nervous depressants, meaning ...

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How can CI repressor both activate and repress $P_{RM}$ promoter found in $\lambda$ phage?
5 votes

I'm tempted to say, "It's complicated." CI does indeed act as both a repressor and activator. Transcription regulation in the lambda bacteriophage is quite complex for such a small system, so some ...

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Do any nonhuman species have effective ebola immunity?
1 votes

While at least some other primates are suspectible to Ebola, pigs appear to be immune. From the WHO factsheet on Ebola (1): Although non-human primates have been a source of infection for humans, ...

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Why Only DNA can Contain Hereditary Material?
2 votes

I think any discussion of this question can benefit from a historical perspective. For a long time, it was in fact believed that proteins was the hereditary material. The Nature Scitable page on the ...

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Why does methylation not occur in viral DNA?
4 votes

Contrary to the question title, viral DNA can be methylated. See for example Bonvicini et al. 2012. (1) and Hoelzer et al. 2008 (2). Hoelzer et al. give a review of the presence and role of ...

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By what mechanism can hypoglycemia induce fainting?
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5 votes

There are regulatory mechanisms that may prevent moderate hypoglycemia to progress to a more severe state, however these mechanisms act before lack of conciousness sets in. The progression of ...

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Do humans sneeze or cough in their sleep?
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14 votes

Sneezing does not occur during REM sleep, due to REM atonia.(1) The coughing reflex is also suppressed during sleep, but coughing may still occur occasionally during sleep. (2).

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Task-dependent "reversed" handedness: why use left hand for some tasks? How is it controlled by the brain?
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7 votes

The dynamic-dominance hypothesis of handedness states that the essential factor that distinguishes dominant from nondominant arm performance is the facility governing the control of limb dynamics. ...

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Do people with gout live longer?
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5 votes

In men, gout is associated with a higher risk of death from all causes. This would imply that their life expectancy is shorter. From a review by Kim et al. (1): Among men who did not have pre-...

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Is there any documented case in which floating substances led to the introduction of a new species?
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4 votes

There is a number of reported cases of marine species reaching new locations through "hitchhiking" in recent times. However, it seems harder to find reports of species actually becoming established in ...

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What is this abbreviation CT in female reproductive system
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4 votes

I think CT is an abbreviation for connective tissue. Some examples of its use in that fashion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connective_tissue https://web.archive.org/web/20151024041339/http://www....

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In what circumstances does a mammalian egg copy its DNA?
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1 votes

The writers of the show may have been somewhat imprecise either by accident or intentionally to avoid excessive details. There are several different stages of egg cells, with distinct names for each ...

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How does gene expression work in an adult organism? Is everything encoded everywhere?
3 votes

With some exceptions (one being red blood cells), all cells in the body contain the complete genome of the individual. The expression of the genes however is, as mentioned in the comments, heavily ...

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How was the Huntington's disease gene's location found?
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5 votes

A Google search for "Huntingtons disease gene discovery" yielded this page at the Nature Education Scitable website. The following citations are provided regarding the molecular basis of HD: ...

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What does it mean for a chemical pathway to be conserved?
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5 votes

A conserved pathway is a pathway that exists in a variety of species, by virtue of that pathway being conserved throughout the evolution of those species. A pathway must by neccessity have appeared ...

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Why does ear wax taste sour?
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7 votes

Earwax, also called cerumen, is slightly acidic (1), with a pH of about 6, and acidic foods or substances taste sour. The composition of earwax, upon which its taste depends, is related to its ...

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