JimN
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What is this strange sea creature we found on the beach?
Accepted answer
36 votes

You have a Dosima: Also known as a Buoy Barnacle. A gallery of observations of these can be found here: https://inaturalist.ca/taxa/462188-Dosima/browse_photos They are found in the coastal UK and ...

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What insect eggs are these?
8 votes

These are caterpillar/butterfly eggs belonging to the Rounded Palm-Redeye (Erionota torus). Here is an example of the eggs of a leaf: The larvae / caterpillar form looks like this: And fully formed ...

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Mystery rodent in Winnipeg
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8 votes

That is a Franklin's Ground Squirrel Winnipeg is part of its range: Have a look at a gallery of such photos here: https://inaturalist.ca/taxa/179937-Poliocitellus-franklinii/browse_photos

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What arthropod is in the picture?
5 votes

It is not a pseudoscorpion as those would have 8 legs and then the two front large pincers. This is most likely a kind a jumping spider where the two large front legs count as two of the 8 legs. ...

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What is this tiny creature?
5 votes

The picture is hard to see details, but it seems you might be dealing with ghost ants: I'm guessing ghost ants over lice or termites or bed bugs because their light-coloured abdomen ends off in a ...

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What is this long cylindrical white fruit called?
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5 votes

It appears this is a Kigela (and commonly referred to as a "Sausage tree" in English). It is - as you suspected - considered inedible and even poisonous in its fresh form (but apparently it ...

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Middle European Spider Identification
3 votes

This is a wolf spider. It is not Tegenaria because you would see long spinnerets at the back end of the abdomen, and the legs would not have splotchy black marks, but instead have bands of dark ...

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What are those berry-like plants in this photo?
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3 votes

Without knowing the geography of where the photo was taken, we could guess this is a European Mountain Ash (Sorbus aucuparia) which is fairly widespread in North America and Europe (but doesn't really ...

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Do "shooting" animals exist?
3 votes

Spitting spiders will shoot their strands of web (extremely quickly) toward prey: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFozCr_tj8I

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Arthropod identification request (a spider with no legs?)
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3 votes

This appears to be the underside of a walnut orbweaver: These orbweaver spiders are not medically significant. Spiders often lose their legs in wasp attacks. Some spider wasps will remove the legs ...

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What kind of parasite is this?
3 votes

This is pear rust (Gymnosporangium sabinae). It is fairly widespread in the northern hemisphere: It is a fungal infection and affects pear trees from junipers. Pruning the affected nearby junipers ...

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Identification of a lifeform
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3 votes

This is a polyclad flatworm. Here is a video of notoplana vitrea moving similarly to the one in the video that you linked: https://www.asturnatura.com/especie/notoplana-vitrea.html Here is a gallery ...

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Identify this dragonfly with orange body and orange wings?
3 votes

These seem to both be Neurothemis taiwanensis. On iNaturalist, if you search for dragonflies in Taiwan, it finds 104 species observed and submitted, and this Neurothemis taiwanensis is the most ...

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Kansas Spider Identification, found in Pasta Package
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2 votes

It is a crab spider, likely of genus Xysticus but possibly genus Ozyptila. If you needed to get down to genus, bugguide (https://bugguide.net/node/view/63082) says that we can differentiate these ...

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Can you name this spider?
2 votes

This is a false wolf spider called Zoropsis spinimana: It is found all over Europe, including the London,UK area: A photo gallery and distribution map of user-submitted observations of Zoropsis ...

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what is this centipede like creature?
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2 votes

dark bands between segments and long tails match: Distribution matches:

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What spider is this? Is this invasive or dangerous?
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2 votes

That appears to be a zebra jumping spider (Salticus scenicus). It is fairly widespread throughout North America. It does not post any kind of threat to people or to the environment: Here is a map of ...

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Phytophagous worm identification
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2 votes

I think you have an Indian Lily Moth (of the genus Polytela). It is considered a minor pest. Their habitat seems to only be around India and its surrounding area. Their worm matches yours ... smooth, ...

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From what kind of insect might these eggs be
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2 votes

Those are likely moth eggs... moths have a tendency to attach their eggs on metal screens that you might have in your windows or doors. Here is a video of a moth laying eggs on glass: https://www....

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Fabric melting spider juice
2 votes

Some spiders are known to eat their own silk when breaking down a web and reconstructing it (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider_web#:~:text=It%20is%20common%20for%20spiders) or even stealing the web ...

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What is this lightning-fast tiny spider?
2 votes

Many web-dwelling spiders are lightning-quick in their own web (even if they are slow/clumsy walkers outside of their web) so that doesn't help in identification. Hard to tell from the photo, but it ...

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Bug identification
1 votes

This is an immature cockroach, possibly Planuncus vinzi. Here is a map of the observed distribution of the Planuncus genus: And here is an extract of a gallery of nymph-stage Planuncus cockroaches: ...

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Species Identification: Spider
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1 votes

The images in the question are of a giant house spider, as hypothesized in the question. (Eratigena duellica/atrica/saeva). These (along with the hobo spider, Eratigena agrestis) do not have any ...

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Help identifying organism
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1 votes

It is definitely a crab - not anything spider. I originally thought it was a Sally Lightfoot Crab (a common crab on Madeira from the family of shore crabs) but I agree on your comment that it is more ...

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What causes the sound of climaxing bees?
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1 votes

Firstly, those aren't bumblebee faces ... those are big fly eyes. Those are Bumblebee Hover Flies (Volucella bombylans): The noise in the first part of the video is identical to a fly flying around ...

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Characteristics of Araneus hui (an orb-weaving spider)
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1 votes

These pages cite papers that mention A.hui: https://www.gbif.org/species/2160156 https://wsc.nmbe.ch/species/2910/Araneus_hui The World Spider Catalog (WSC) offers papers to their users for free, and ...

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What kind of spider is this? First time I have ever seen one
1 votes

It appears that you have a leafcurling sac spider: They are observed all over east and west north america: Here is the eye arrangement from bugguide: I labeled with arrows the two thin dots at the ...

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What is the name of this spider I found in The Netherlands?
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1 votes

I believe you are looking at a spider mite of the genus Anystis or Tetranychus. Both of these have The Netherlands in their range. Here is an info page on the two genuses, includes a map of ...

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Why is this spider wound in such a dense web?
1 votes

From the look of the spider outline, it looks to have short legs and is dark. A yellow sac spider is quite light-coloured and has long legs. Yellow sacs and clubionids will sometimes make themselves a ...

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What species of spider is this? Could anyone help
1 votes

This is a male Carrhotus sannio (the females are brown/grey). The white dorsal stripe on the cephalothorax is right beneath the outside eye; the upside-down v-marks on the back of the abdomen point to ...

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