Raoul
  • Member for 7 years, 5 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
What happens to bones that do not heal?
Accepted answer
9 votes

Fracture healing occurrs in several steps: haemorrhage: blood and surrounding cells fill the space created by the fracture. fibrous callus: chondrocytes colonize the fracture space, with ...

View answer
What is the name of the condition where no pacemaker cells are active in the heart for a short-time?
Accepted answer
7 votes

If there are no pacemaker cells active, no muscle contraction will occur. This condition is named asystole. It can be a temporary or definitive condition. Some would call it "extreme bradycardia" in ...

View answer
Gastro-intestinal physiology reference
Accepted answer
7 votes

If you have no medical background at all, you will need a general text that teaches more than just digestive physiology. That is because you need to understand the function of other systems that have ...

View answer
Why is high fructose corn syrup unhealthy?
6 votes

Fructose has a special characteristic that other sugars do not have: its absorption in the human intestine is not regulated, as opposed to glucose, for example. The important implication is that all ...

View answer
Why do moths not die when they fly into a window?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Simply because their body mass is small. It's the same as if an ant falls off from the roof of a building. It will suffer no harm because the speed of its fall will be very slow, but try the same ...

View answer
What are the benefits of statins in terms of prolonging life?
4 votes

I suspect I won't be crunching as much numbers as you'd want me to, however here are some basic points: Statins have shown a clear ability to improve the blood llipid profile. Their use in primary/...

View answer
Are there any situations in which phenylephrine is preferred to pseudoephedrine?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Yes, in all clinical situations where you need pure vasoconstriction without heart rate acceleration (mostly valid for iv administration route). The classical example would be in the operative ...

View answer
Can systemic intravascular thrombosis cause brain infarction?
3 votes

No, thrombi are far too bulky to cross the blood brain barrier. Now regarding the risk of stroke in case of systemic thrombi Yes, there are 2 situations where this can arise: floating thrombus of the ...

View answer
Liver - Regeneration in Cirrhosis
Accepted answer
3 votes

The answer lies in the question. Liver cirrhosis constrains hepatocytes into small fibrous spaces limiting regeneration, hence the nodular pattern. However,fibrous degeneration occurs in specific ...

View answer
How to maximize lung oxygen intake?
Accepted answer
3 votes

You cannot change the oxygen concentration of inhaled air in the absence of an external source of oxygen. However, you can use your lungs at their maximum capacity doing this: breathe deeply: =...

View answer
Are there any generic (not dependent on symptoms) ways to find parasite infections?
Accepted answer
3 votes

The first thing that comes to mind would be eosinophils numeration. It is a specific type of white blood cell that handles parasitic infections. So in most cases, a blood sample would show an increase ...

View answer
How can succinylcholine cause myorelaxation?
3 votes

Succinycholine, as its name might suggest, is a cholinergic agonist indeed. It acts on the neural plate of skeletal muscles, where it activates the muscle cholinergic receptors. Phase 1 block due to ...

View answer
Specific location where nerves converge
Accepted answer
3 votes

By reasoning, we can make the following distinction: the trigeminal nerve is a cranial nerve. the 2 others are peripheral nerves. Cranial nerves take their origin into their respective nuclei, and ...

View answer
Are all functions of a human cell known?
Accepted answer
3 votes

As someone who has dabbled in both biology and programming, I assume you are referring to the theoritical ability of functional programming to simulate organic behaviour from well defined input. From ...

View answer
How efficient is the human body at metabolizing food?
3 votes

I suspect that what you are actually looking for is the following: - 1 gram of fat = 9 kcal - 1 gram of protein = 4 kcal - 1 gram of sugar = 4 kcal - 1 gram of alcohol = 7 kcal Those are general and ...

View answer
Why are people tired after surgery?
3 votes

Answers in comments are correct. The tail effect of hypnotic drugs combined to opiates given for pain relief will make you feel really tired just after surgery. But if you are referring to a more ...

View answer
Pharmacokinetics: why do certain drugs follow zero-order kinetics?
3 votes

Basically any compound in concentrations sufficient to saturate its metabolization machinery will show zero-order pharmacokinetics. This reflects the fact that metabolization is taking place at full ...

View answer
Is there a difference between drinking water straight from the tap compared to leaving it to sit?
3 votes

If you are speaking especially of the stomach, it actually makes no difference because the extremely low pH of the stomach allows very few bacterial organisms to survive. Often, Helicobacter pylori ...

View answer
Why does the arch of aorta coils?
Accepted answer
3 votes

The main question can be answered in a very dumb way: because the lower part of the body also needs blood... and this configuration is the surest way of doing that because of reasons given below (...

View answer
Why is the human body able to repair a broken bone and not a heart muscle?
3 votes

Part of the answer is in fact extremely simple: coronary arteries (irrigating the heart muscle) are terminal vessels. This means that when a coronary artery sustains damage, the area it was irrigating ...

View answer
How does vasoconstriction/vasodilation change blood pressure?
2 votes

I'll try a brief answer myself. No, the heart is not the only energy provider, as others have stated above. Does vasoconstriction inject energy into the system? Not really. Arteriolar constriction ...

View answer
What specific sensory nerves act as receptors for "pins and needles" (neuropathy)?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Pins-and-needles (PAN) sensation and pain stem from the same nerves. The pathophysiologic process is different, though. PAN is characteristic of nerve lesion, and is therefore a pathologic reaction. ...

View answer
Negative role of Placenta
Accepted answer
2 votes

The placenta does not turn "hostile" to the mother or fetus. Placentation abnormalities can result in harmful situations, but these are a secondary result. Structural anomalies of placentation: ...

View answer
Pharmacology: Drug Administration
2 votes

Let's review drug administration routes, and see for yourself: transdermal/ionophoric: expensive, unreliable release concentrations (which makes it expensive because of the extensive research needed ...

View answer
What is the smallest scale at which blood vessels, nerves and other structures are deterministic?
2 votes

The answer is... basically none. The variability is high, and can also happen in the macroscopic range. If you want a quick-and-dirty idea of the fraction of the population presenting a certain ...

View answer
Why is Aorta sometimes called Compression chamber?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The aorta is a compression chamber because it is an important drive for diastolic perfusion. To keep the blood flowing constantly, and not only during systole (as would be the case with a rigid aorta),...

View answer
Why there is a very high drop in pressure from arteries to arterioles?
Accepted answer
2 votes

While correct, @AndroidPenguin 's answer is only part of the explanation. By far the main reason of the pressure difference is that the peripheral circulatory system has two main compartments: a ...

View answer
Why some muscles have more tendons than others?
2 votes

If you observe the general structure of the locomotor system, you will be able to roughly separate muscles in two main groups: the muscles used for static work and position maintenance. those ...

View answer
Where does the exudate comes from during inflammation?
1 votes

exsudates almost exclusively come from the capillary compartment. If you think about the structure of the vessels, this appears logical. The capillary compartment : has vessels only several microns ...

View answer
How and where do nerves share pathways to the brain?
1 votes

The first layer of sensory integration from neural interconnection lies in the spinal dorsal horns (for somatosensory stimuli), and the spinal anterolateral system (for painful stimuli). It resembles ...

View answer