4
$\begingroup$

I would be grateful for help identifying the insect depicted in the attached picture. It was found inside a residential building (ground floor) at the periphery of Valladolid, a city in Yucatán, Mexico. Unfortunately, I am unable to provide a precise size, but from my recollection, it was about 1-2 cm long. By my (highly uneducated) guess, it seems that it might be an early stage of a member of the Triatominae subfamily, but I would appreciate a more precise/informed identification.

Unknown species of insect

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ it looks like a weevil $\endgroup$
    – timeskull
    Apr 20, 2023 at 15:27

1 Answer 1

4
$\begingroup$

This is a weevil, a beetle in the superfamily Curculionoidea. Most weevils are easily identified by the usually-present elongated snout (or rostrum [Davis (2017)] )

There a number of common home-invading weeviles (e.g., see UMN Extension), including a number of nuisance grain weevils (see my previous Bio.SE post). However, your specimen does not look like any of these....

Your specimen reminds me quit a bit of one of the better known species, the boll weevile (Anthonomus grandis), which is native to Mexico but is typically found in/around cotton fields. (I don't suppose you live near or work with cotton?). Though, your specimen is also larger than the typical 0.3-1.0 cm size of the boll weevil.

  • Field guide to similar weevils available here1.

enter image description here

Boll weevil. Source: Jones & Williams (2001)

Wikipedia states:

Because so many species exist in such diversity, the higher classification of weevils is in a state of flux.

As such (and since your specimen is not one of the common house pest species I'm used to seeing), I'm going to leave my post open ended unless you end up updating with additional details. I think the boll weevil is ultimately unlikely your specimen (though not impossible), but it should serve as a good example to demonstrate this group and a potential jumping-off point for further investigation.

  • Also, see Jones et al. (2019) for Emergent and Possible Invasive Pest Species of Weevils in Mexico

1. Jones R. and M. R. Williams. 2001. A field guide to boll weevil identification. Technical Bulletin 228. Mississippi Agricultural & forestry Experiment Station.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .