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Lymphatic drainage occurs from many portions of the body:

To venous angle:

  • head
  • axillary lymph nodes
    • hands
    • abdomen
      • legs (I think legs' drainage goes through abdomen)

The speed of the lymph drainage is different in each part of the body depending on the situation at hand.

Assume you have tense muscles in the hand (biceps and trieps). The lymphatic drainage there can be lowered and be the limiting factor in the system.

I think lowered lymphatic drainage in one part of the body causes more lymph goes to other parts of the body.

What are the negative results of too high lymphatic drainage in an organ? My intuition

  • edema
  • hypertrophy in some cases (excess of nutrients)
  • hypertension

Negative results of too slow lymphatic drainage are the prolonged intoxication times of

  • biological,
  • chemical and
  • physical factors.

I am trying to find any studies about the effective speed of lymphatic drainage. I have an intuition that the lowest drainage of one section is the limiting factor in the whole system. Is there any studies about how to quantify the speed of lymphatic drainage from one part of the body?

Heart pumps (blood) and sucks (lymph). So probably some cardiovascular study relates the pumping to the lymphatic drainage.

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    $\begingroup$ I vaguely recall an old study looking at lymphatic flow in sheep, and the range being very heterogeneous (virtually no flow at the lower bound). I would agree that, in general, this is a very heterogeneous effect subject to many chemical (hydration, osmotic balance, blood pressure modifying drugs) and physical (cardiovascular tone, posture, activity level) factors. $\endgroup$ – user560 Apr 16 '14 at 19:13
  • $\begingroup$ Probably, this one: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3444363 ? $\endgroup$ – Léo Léopold Hertz 준영 Apr 16 '14 at 19:18
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    $\begingroup$ Looks correct, Masi. $\endgroup$ – user560 Apr 16 '14 at 19:23
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    $\begingroup$ Oh Masi, you and I share the same interests (pharmacology and lymphatics) and I do enjoy your questions... very old school... I wondered the same question your asking leonardo myself and I ended up buying this book: sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780120425204... the cheapest way to buy it is on google play... I've only had the time to read certain parts, usually focusing on lymphatics, but I haven't even finished that... it's an old book from the mid 80s, and the information on lymphatics is often incomplete... but it's the best I know of... $\endgroup$ – Jasand Pruski Jan 27 '15 at 6:20
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    $\begingroup$ wow, I'm jealous! I'm looking at the programs in alto and it seems they're not too focused on biology more engineering, but in a way thats great, new methods for studying things hard to study. I appreciate the book recommendations on soft matter, I'll look into them and perhaps when I have the funds I'll purchase one. It seems like theres some overlap on soft matter and rheology (not that I know anything about that either)... the word "liquid crystal is great. Also it seems like it's a meeting point for studying physical properties of cell membranes and ECM/interstitium...very interesting. :) $\endgroup$ – Jasand Pruski Jan 29 '15 at 0:38
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Leonardo's answer:

  • Animal study on sheep - here.

where

[L]ymphatic flow in sheep, and the range being very heterogeneous (virtually no flow at the lower bound). I would agree that, in general, this is a very heterogeneous effect subject to many chemical (hydration, osmotic balance, blood pressure modifying drugs) and physical (cardiovascular tone, posture, activity level) factors.

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