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I have come across these insects a lot more lately, as far as I can tell, they can sustain a hover state in flight. I'm actually quite interested to know what these are, seeing they look like a cross between a bumblebee and a common housefly...

What species is this...?

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    $\begingroup$ For species ID questions, it is very useful to know where and when you saw the animal, and it can be useful to know details such as weather conditions. Could you provide some of these extra details? $\endgroup$ – bshane Nov 6 '15 at 6:33
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    $\begingroup$ Easily done, lower Blue Mountains, Bew South Wales in Australia, about 4pm AEST, overcast conditions... $\endgroup$ – Eliseo d'Annunzio Nov 6 '15 at 6:47
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    $\begingroup$ Based on location, behaviour, and markings, I'd go with some sort of hoverfly (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoverfly). I can't offer positive ID, but I would hazard a guess at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melangyna_viridiceps based on the all-black thorax and the fact that this species is relatively common. $\endgroup$ – bshane Nov 6 '15 at 7:12
  • $\begingroup$ New South Wales* $\endgroup$ – Eliseo d'Annunzio Nov 6 '15 at 7:20
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    $\begingroup$ It's definitely a hoverfly (Syrphidae), but I don't you will get a certain identification to the species level based on that single photograph. $\endgroup$ – fileunderwater Nov 6 '15 at 11:18
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Looks very similar to Eupeodes corollae (Syrphidae). But only a specialist in the group will tell you if its the same species, genus or family. And not with that low-resolution photograph (sometimes they need to take the genitals off for proper identification).

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  • $\begingroup$ the photo was the best I could I at short notice... I'll see if I can update the photo at a later time. $\endgroup$ – Eliseo d'Annunzio Nov 6 '15 at 21:15
  • $\begingroup$ Better talk to a specialist. Depending on the group, you can only know the species by capturing an individual. And sometimes, only knowing the place and the flower it's in, is enough for the identification. $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo Nov 6 '15 at 21:24

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