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When one studies cell division, usually the process is explained through what happens with the DNA of the cell, particularly, that in eukaryotes the nucleus dissolves. But what happens to the rest of the organelles? I read here what happens to the ER and Golgi complex, in particular I'm wondering what happens to the mitochondria, in which part does it reproduces? do they make a parallel process? or do they get dissolved?

$%--------- %I started wondering about this because I was reading Lynn Margulis' article _Bacterial Bedfellows_, and it baffles me that in such little time an organism can just coexist with an attacker and turn it in a _good relationship_, how ever it's not clear to me how cell reproduction might work in those cases.$

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During mitosis the cellular organelles that have their own genetic information reproduce independently. Other organelles like the Golgi complex disintegrates and then form all over again in the daughter cells. Other organelles that are smaller and more numerous like ribosomes are divided between the two cells. Meiosis is the same thing only that there is crossing over in the nucleus of the cell.

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    $\begingroup$ So mitochondria reproduces at the same time as the rest of the cell? $\endgroup$ – Ana Galois Jun 6 '17 at 0:00
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    $\begingroup$ Mitochondria can reproduce on their own. I'm not sure how this is controlled exactly, so maybe it happens at a different time point. Also note that DNA replication (or reproduction if you will) does not happen at the same time as cell replication (mitosis/meiosis) $\endgroup$ – Nicolai Jun 6 '17 at 4:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Nicolai 'Also note that DNA replication (or reproduction if you will) does not happen at the same time as cell replication (mitosis/meiosis)'... In cell cycle, S-phase and M-phase are two distinct phases where the cell divides and DNA replicates receptively. Also the cell cycle almost in all standard text based on the pattern of division is termed Mitosis/Meiosis (not the M-phase). A slight wording issue. $\endgroup$ – Tyto alba Jun 7 '17 at 18:53

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