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What's the minimum, if any, concentration of atmospheric nitrogen needed by plants? Would plants be able to grow in an atmosphere with just carbon dioxide and oxygen?

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    $\begingroup$ @GrahamChiu plants do not get nitrogen from the air. $\endgroup$ – John Apr 1 '18 at 4:22
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    $\begingroup$ @John I never said they did. Bacteriae and fungi fix nitrogen and then supply the plants. $\endgroup$ – Graham Chiu Apr 1 '18 at 4:29
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    $\begingroup$ @xusr with no nitrogen cycle? $\endgroup$ – Graham Chiu Apr 1 '18 at 8:39
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    $\begingroup$ @xusr so please explain how a nitrogen cycle occurs with no atmospheric nitrogen. $\endgroup$ – Graham Chiu Apr 1 '18 at 8:58
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    $\begingroup$ @xusr azotictechnologies.com/index.php/technology/n-fix and exactly where is the nitrogen for the harber process coming from? $\endgroup$ – Graham Chiu Apr 1 '18 at 9:14
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Zero if you are supplying them with solid nitrates in their growth medium, plants can't use atmospheric nitrogen. Some soil bacteria can and create nitrates the plants can use but this can and often is supplied by other means.

But as Graham points out you will need another inert gas to fill in the atmosphere as high concentrations of CO2 or Oxygen are both toxic.

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    $\begingroup$ If there is not nitrogen, then there will need to be another gas as an excess of either Co2 or O2 will cause problems. $\endgroup$ – Graham Chiu Apr 1 '18 at 4:31

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