12

Yes they can, but their normal growth is somewhat impaired. A study by Bugbee and collaborators showed that while the yield of rice and wheat increases with CO2 up to about 0.1% CO2, yield decreases sharply as CO2 climbs from 0.1% to 0.25%. There is a smaller loss in yield as CO2 is further increased from 0.25% to 2%. One interesting thing to note about the ...


10

Disclaimer: the question is too broad and speculative to some extent, and thus less likely to get complete answer (at least in a single post). As is already known, thousands (or millions) of species are dependent on coral reefs for their survival and are likely to get extinct (unless they adapt) because of destruction of coral reefs. A short list includes ...


6

The answer to your question is in the first graph of the Wikipedia article you linked to: Great Oxygenation Event. In that graph, where time is measures in billions of years, you see that O2, as it was produced, was absorbed in oceans, seabed rock, land surfaces, and finally, about .85 billion years ago, O2 sinks filled and the gas accumulated in the ...


5

First of all, let’s consider your Methanosarcina scenario in specific. Methanosarcina with those properties are still around. So, there is no reason to expect that introducing some ancient Methanosarcina into a suitable environment today would do very much – as they should already be there. Any existing (large-scale) environment providing a niche for ...


4

I don't think anyone knows for sure. It will certainly depend on which spatial location, and which tree species, you're thinking of: while "global average effect on growth (e.g. measured by change in net ecosystem exchange of forested ecosystems) of all tree species" is at least well-defined, it will be an average across an enormously variable set of ...


4

Short Answer I do not believe that CO2 will become less available to phytoplankton on a global scale in the foreseeable future. Instead, I believe that rates of increasing concentrations of CO2 (and resulting chemical products) will not remain sustained at their current levels. There are two global change phenomenon occurring that are relevant : increasing ...


3

tl;dr We don't really know. A reasonable guess is that it's a weak sink, gradually turning into a source via increased drought frequency, but it's extremely hard to measure; carbon flux is highly variable both spatially and temporally (so it matters both when and where you measure), and it's difficult to make sure that you're accurately measuring all the ...


3

Too much nitrogen can run off during rain and collect in ponds, leading to eutriphication, find more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eutrophication It's probably also responsible for dead zones: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_zone_%28ecology%29 This is an important question because we've more than doubled the amount of bioavailable nitrogen on ...


2

Althugh water vapor contributes to greenhouse warming of the atmosphere, changes in atmospheric water vapor tend to follow rather than drive changes in temperature. Also, in the form of clouds, atmospheric water can have a cooling effect on earth temperature. Clouds illustrate why water vapor, unlike carbon dioxide and methane, is not thought of as a driver ...


2

"Within-season variation" may be referring to one of two things (depending on the context): More commonly: the variation of a variable within a given season (i.e., between months or days within that season). Öst (1999) demonstrates an example of this use (in the context of breeding season). Less commonly: the variation of a variable between the same ...


2

Not exactly matching your question, but I think that the idea (from stochastic demography) that life histories should be buffered against environmental variability in influential vital rates (Pfister, 1998, Morris & Doak, 2004) can be related to this issue, even if it is mainly (originally) dealing with stationary environmental fluctuations. In general, ...


2

This is a big idea that's gaining momentum in many people's minds across the world. This is a brief and probably inadequate survey and hopefully other answers / comments will fill out a better picture. Most of the plans to reclaim arid regions are not completely hands off. It seems that the current thinking is that if we waited for microbes and lichen to ...


1

I am still not 100% sure of what the intent is here, but I think that you should look into community assembly rules. The basic (not universally or even generally accepted) idea is that there is some set of "rules" that makes a "successful" or stable ecological community. You can use those rules to design communities accordingly, goes the ...


1

bambara groundnut does not have a reference genome This is your biggest problem if you want to do any sequencing based analysis. Neither GWAS nor RNAseq data analysis are possible without a reference genome (or at least transcriptome). Depending on the availability, quality & similarity of reference genomes from related species it may however be ...


1

Plants do not need CO2 for survival. They need it just for photosynthesis; if you supply them with alternate carbon source such as glucose then they would survive (See here for non-CO2 Carbon-source utilization). There are non-photosynthetic plants which are totally dependent on carbon sources other than CO2; some are carnivorous like venus fly-trap. I am ...


1

Up to a certain point, adding nitrogen to soil will increase plant growth. However, too much nitrogen will "burn" plants- stunting root growth and making the plant more susceptible to diseases. Unfortunately, I don't know at exactly what threshold nitrogen becomes "too much"- I suppose it would vary depending on the plants.


1

Take a look at Paragraph 2. I'll outline it in more or less plain english (I hope). for 37 lakes they used this method: 1) they took a sample of water from 0.1 to 0.25 m below the surface. Using a thermos bottle. This would minimize change of the gas composition of the water with a change of temperature. The bottle was not sealed, but left out for a ...


1

Not my field but I have a couple of thoughts: According to your link, the blue line represents the change in the trend and the red bars are the temperatures. These have not remained that stable, it is the bar that gives that illusion: A much more important point are the grey bars extending above and below each year's value. This is the range of uncertainty,...


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