53

Unfortunately, you're the first I've seen on here actually to have a bed bug. See this picture from University of Kentucky for comparison: Here is one moving (more footage & info here): Below is a picture from Bed-Bugs-Handbook.com demonstrating the relative size and appearance of 6 different life (molt) stages: From Left to Right: Nymphs to adults ...


26

Short answer Cockroaches are an integral part of the food chain. Background Cockroaches are an important source of food for a number of organisms, such as arthropods, birds, and mammals. As such, they are an important part of the food chain. Cockroaches also play an important role in nutrient recycling. Most species of cockroach are detritus feeders and ...


15

They don't have to "contribute" as such. All they have to do is survive and pass on their genes to their offspring. Any benefits that they have (in terms of detritus cleaned up, etc.) or harms that they cause is purely coincidental. There's no "desire" on the behalf of species to make things "better". All they "do" is try to survive in their existing ...


15

Yes this is an adult carpet beetle. Specifically, this is a Common carpet beetle (Anthrenus scrophulariae) See here for more info. 2.5 to 3.8 mm in length. Black head (mostly hidden by the prothorax) + black thorax and elytra with distinct scale patterns. The thorax is covered with white scales except for a large midline. The elytra have ...


14

These are European paper wasps. (They look very similar to yellowjacket wasps but you can notice the antennae; they are brown here whereas they are black in case of yellowjackets. There are other subtle differences too.) See this post on Gardening & Landscaping stackexchange about getting rid of wasps. (This part is probably not really on-topic here ...


14

To answer your question this is very likely NOT a bedbug. See this answer for a positive ID of (and more info for) a bedbug. However, based on the size and body shape of your specimen, it appears you've found another blood sucking paristic pest: a flea. Sources: Here, here and here. General Info: Fleas are small flightless parasitic insects (order ...


10

This is a species of psocid (of the family Psocoptera, AKA booklice). Species are best differentiated by their abdominal structure and antennae. Without a better (more magnified) image and info about the OP's location, identification to species is not possible. Though its small size will definitely narrow the options. If I had to guess based on the ...


9

Sterile insects are typically produced by radiation. A sufficient dose is used to cause substantial DNA damage in the gametes of the males. However, this doesn't mean the sperm are completely non-functional. In fact, it is important that the sperm are functional and simply contain dominant-lethal mutations at a sufficient probability (Robinson, 2005 ...


5

These are definitely some sort of aphid (small sap-sucking true bugs in the superfamily Aphidoidea). Based on the coloration and shape of the pest and the host plant, my best guess is that you're looking at Hyalopterus pruni (or the Mealy Plum Aphid). Note: the scientific name of this species has changed at least 21 times! Photo by Jack Kelly Clark ...


5

I believe this is the middle instar of a Southern Armyworm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae. Or some closely related species in the Spodoptera genus (family Noctuidae). © 2016 Wings, Worms, & Wonder The larvae undergo six instars as they grow to attain a length of about 35 mm. You can see a series of life stage pictures from Mississippi State. ...


4

It appears that the gypsy moths were controlled by pesticide spraying by the US Forestry Service. The defoliation areas measured peaked at 12 million acres in 1981 and again at 7 million acres in 1990. In response, there was significant spraying of various insecticides starting from 1982 through 1996, peaking in 1990. This spraying managed to keep gypsy ...


4

That is a butterfly chrysalis. Since it is clear, and you can see the wings, it is about to emerge. A chrysalis is the naked pupal stage of a butterfly, as opposed to a "cocoon", which is covered in silk.


3

First, for the record, I do not know the North American Starling situation well. However, I know of one study (Koenig, 2003) that failed to find strong effects of Starlings on other cavity nesters (i.e. looking at effects from cavity competition). When trying to control for other effects, only one species was potentially negatively effected by Starlings. ...


3

That is an Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella. Family Pyralidae. They are very common household pests. https://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/indian_meal_moth.htm They breed in grains or cereals. You need to look through your pantry, and find out what they have been breeding in. Seal up your grains and cereals in plastic, or put them all in the fridge.


2

I had a bed bug infestation a few months ago. That picture looks like it could be a bed bug that hasn't fed in a while. But, the overall body shape looks more like a flea.... Bed bugs look different depending on what stage of life they are and whether or not they have fed recently. The picture below is a bed bug who has recently fed. You'll notice his body ...


2

You must read this article: “Most cockroaches feed on decaying organic matter, which traps a lot of nitrogen,” Kambhampati said. “Cockroach feeding has the effect of releasing that nitrogen (in their feces) which then gets into the soil and is used by plants. In other words, extinction of cockroaches would have a big impact on forest health and ...


2

Short answers: These insects live near water or marsh areas so that's where you can get them from. This is because many species of this group has larvae that are aquatic or semi-aquatic. According to wikipedia: The adults drink dew and nectar. And it is their larvae that either prey on or become parasites of gastropods. In this article the following ...


2

These are probably cockroach cases, or oothecae, that may contain up to 50 eggs, depending on species. It looks like they are oothecaes of German cockroaches. You can read more about baby cockroaches here.


2

I think these are cockroach oothecae. These are small casings that contain many eggs. Quoting from wikipedia Female cockroaches are sometimes seen carrying egg cases on the end of their abdomens; the German cockroach holds about 30 to 40 long, thin eggs in a case called an ootheca. She drops the capsule prior to hatching, though live births do occur in ...


2

This is probably a common flour moth or a similar pyralid species. It has probably laid eggs in some cereal-derived products (pasta, cous cous, but also rice, oatmeal and the like) of your kitchen. First of all, check carefully your pantry for infested food and throw it away. Then (from the above Wikipedia link): None of the stages of the organism (eggs, ...


1

According to the pest control expert, the ants are likely pharaoh ants. It matches the description on the Wikipedia page in all respects: Colour Size Pervasiveness in indoor environments throughout the world He is treating the problem in my unit and a neighbour's unit using Maxforce Quantum. It could take some time :( . This is not conducive to a ...


1

Stay vigilant. As you've noticed, once wasps get established in an area, they'll reproduce and spread out. Continue to watch for and eradicate nests. Hardware stores will sell a variety of chemical sprays, but a mix of liquid soap (dish detergent) and water works just as well. Use wasp traps to prevent wasps from establishing new nests in your area. You ...


1

The species name of this insect is the gooseberry saw fly. There are three related species, I think this is the pale spotted gooseberry sawfly because it has a pale green head. They usually have black dots as well, but this might develop when the larvae grow. At least, this is what I observed once in my garden.


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