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The density of Macrocystis pyrifera is pretty variable. According to Dayton et al. 1984 off of the Southern California coast it can range from less than 0.1 to to 1.0 $individuals/m^2$. The variation depends on the location, where there are different exposure levels to high energy waves, upwellings containing nutrients, and predation by sea urchin. Dayton, P....


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I think not. from Kingdoms and Domains: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth By Lynn Margulis, Michael J Chapman. as found on google books You will see there are no chloroplasts depicted. These are eukaryotes and so to do photosynthesis they would need chloroplasts which should be evident.


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As with bacterial cells, number of cell and OD are correlated. I am not a specialist, but it seems that you can use microscope to visually count number of cells, then correlate it with optical density of the solution you have. This will allow you to first establish how many cell correspond to 1 unit of OD, then use OD to estimate number of cells quicker than ...


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I was looking in the wrong kingdom. After much searching I asked myself: are those eggs? Silly me, of course they are. I should have thought it from the start. Mosquitoes plant their eggs on water over night. I was confused because in the past I've never seen the eggs, only the larvae and the pupae in the water. So, that's what I have every morning floating ...


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It really depends on what you mean by "organic matter". No cell is going to be able to grow and reproduce without an appropriate source of CHON atoms (plus lesser amounts of the other necessary elements). So, if by organic matter you mean CHON+, then no, everything needs organic matter to grow and reproduce. If by organic matter, however, you mean natural ...


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The "beto" is a typing mistake. Beta is an organic chemistry label referring to a beta-ring of 6 carbons that exists at either end of a carotenoid polymer C40-Hx. It is localized in the chloroplast. The plants don't really have a mechanism to release pigments, they can re-metabolize chlorophyll. The volvocalean algea Dunaliella salina is used to harvest ...


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This is a fruiticose lichen, meaning one with a bushy growth habit. They are common in my native state of Texas (USA), where they hang off of oak trees. Your photos look much like them. I have seen other examples in the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, in both Oregon and Washington. I can't name the species. In the upper left of your first photo, I see ...


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Yes, Lichen are composite organisms of green algae (or cyanobacteria) living togther with fungi. In most cases the fungi-part is completely dependent on that symbioses and is completely dependent on the symbiosis. For the algae it seems that some species can survive on their own, but not necessarily in the same enviroment as the lichen, while other ...


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There are several combined reasons. first salt itself in such lakes is often pink, so part of the color comes from the salt crust itself. this is more noticeable in more extreme salt lakes where the deposits can be quite thick. It can be due to iron impurities but can also be further dyed by trapped carotenoids in the salt as it is deposited. Part is also ...


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It is not possible to tell which one is "correct" and which one is "incorrect"; Actually "ranking" itself is a bigger problem with entire classification system. After the "sexual species concept" we have somewhat a grasp that many (but not all) species fall on "same rank"; but for supra-specific ranks it is theoretically impossible to tell whether the ...


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I don't see why microalgae couldn't be a main food source (putting aside the taste factor). It contains many different lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and other essential nutrients that are digestible and would be beneficial to humans. I do know that microalgae has a very high lipid content (hence why they're often harvested for biofuels), but it can ...


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