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Welcome to Biology StackExchange. Am I remembering this incorrectly? No, you're remembering it correctly. I think you're talking about slime molds. You'll find more information on the wiki page Is this the video you saw? These images are pretty cool. Is this even possible? Yes (given that it exists). There is no way to correctly answer this ...


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Apparently the most noticeable research on this subject of a rabbit's white behind has been done by Dr Dirk Semmann of the University of Goettingen. He proposes that these spots actually confuse predators because of their very noticeable nature. By focusing on the bright spot, the would-be predator ignores the larger body of the animal. Then, when ...


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The word "Afrothere" comes from Latin Afer (referring to Africa) and Ancient Greek θηρίον ‎(thēríon, meaning “beast”). In other words, "Afrothere" etymologically refers to animals with origins in Africa. So really, Afrotheria and it's members are referred to based on their origins and not their physical characteristics. In other words, ...


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Short answer White matter is called white matter because it is relatively white compared to gray matter. However, in fixated specimens it is not as snowy white as in textbook pictures. Background The internal capsule is a paired V-shaped structure that is visible in horizontal brain slices (Fig. 1). It is a subcortical structure mainly consisting of fiber ...


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I'm going to take a stab here. It looks a lot like Artocarpus altilis or breadfruit. However, the trunk is a bit gnarly for breadfruit, but maybe that is the result of being a street tree. Also, I can't find any reliable information about the variation in the leaves (heterophylly) for this species. However, other species in the genus have entire leaves, ...


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I don't know if this is what you mean, but take a look at BioNumbers. Also, mathematical constants like pi are different from physical constants. Mathematical constants are true in a mathematical (logic) sense, and do not need to be related to any physical quantity. They are derived by logic. Physical constants, on the other hand, typically describe an ...


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A whale has a horizontal tail fin which is a typical feature of mammalian marine animals see link. Mammalian sea animals typically have a vertical movement of the tail fin for swimming. Fishes like sharks have a vertically oriented tail fin and move it side-ways for locomotion.


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These thin, closely-spaced structures are commonly called gills (in more formal contexts a gill is called a lamella). Our most familiar mushrooms have gills, but there are other species that do not have structures of this form. Photo by Jason Hollinger via WikiMedia.org The gills exist for reproduction. Mushrooms spread by producing tiny spores that ...


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Trilobites had bodies divided into 3 lobes lengthwise. Hence the name trilobite = 3-lobed critter. The head or cephalon of the trilobite is large, nearly as broad as the body and marked by sutures. These are the easy-to-see differences. There are several other differences that it would typically take a trained paleontologist to detect, including ...


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You are missing that "bilateral symmetry" does not mean "the divisions are the same on some arbitrary plane" it means "the divisions are the same on one specific plane". That specific plane for animals with bilateral symmetry is on the mid-saggittal plane that divides the body into left and right. You won't get symmetry if you bisect in any other plane. If ...


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I think that species delimitation is not a science, or at least not a coherent one. Different fields use different criteria, for practical or historical reasons. For instance, in plants, loads of fertile hybrids exist between species. It seems that botanists do not split based on the traditional biological definition of what a species is: they apparently ...


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Short answer: Look for a pulvinus at the leaf-stalk/leaf-lamina junction. Long Answer: So from a strictly anatomical identification standpoint, this can be a bit confusing. According to "Plant Identification Terminology: An Illustrated Glossary" (Harris & Harris, 2001): Simple: Undivided, as a leaf blade which is not separated into leaflets. ...


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This looks a lot like a ramosa mutant (for example see the ears in panels A,G,H - taken from Figure 2 from Gallavotti et. al. 20101). Ramosa mutations affect the branching pattern of the inflorescence (i.e. the ear and tassel in maize - aka. corn in the US) and are typically highly variable. These are thought to be partial reversions to the phenotype of ...


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Welcome to the difficult concept called "Species". Let me ask a simple question are tigers and lions different species? They look different (Lion is a solid light brown. Tiger is a darker brown with stripes. Male lions have a mane. Male tigers do not) They are socially different. (Lions live in prides. Tigers are solitary) They are ...


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Albizia julibrissin (Persian silk tree) is doubly compound (AKA bipinnate) and has a conspicuous pink/white fluffy flower. This tree is an Asian native, but it's a commonly cultivated (and equally commonly escaped) plant in the U. S. You should be able to find it in numerous locations. Look in yards and along roads. http://www.missouriplants.com/Pinkalt/...


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The structures you're referring to are called "lamellae" or "gills". They are coated in the spores that the fungus to reproduce. Specifically you find them on Basidiomycete and Agaricomycete fungi. By being 'vented' and hanging beneath the cap of the mushroom, it allows the wind to blow past and dislodge the spores, to fall and then be carried off and plant ...


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You're almost there--both terms concern the relationship between increases in species richness and morphological diversification. They're two opposing patterns: Morphospace expansion indicates that a lineage is occupying new areas of morphospace with increasing species richness. (The slope is more or less relating density of morphospace occupation to ...


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I think you are correct, but I'm not an expert in Diptera/Drosophila morphology. Since the prothorax (pronotum) and metathorax are greatly reduced in flies, you mostly see the mesonotum in dorsal view, and this includes the scutellum. Personally, I think it would have been more accurate of them to label this structure mesonotum, or at least dorsal mesothorax ...


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This is just that one author's opinion - it is telling that both sources you have for the number come from the same author. Henry Markram has a leadership role in the Blue Brain Project, a project to create a very detailed computer simulation of a chunk of neocortex to answer various questions. In the context of this project, it is somewhat necessary to make ...


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Monozygotic twins won't be able to reproduce (naturally), because they are of the same sex. Dizygotic twins may or may not be of the same sex, just as regular siblings; genetically speaking, they are just siblings, not twins, so this case is out of the scope of your question.


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Here is the image in comments. The direction of the sun can be seen from the shadow of the left antenna. I just sketched this image to note some observations, it's the best answer that I can find at this time. source


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Not a mammal. But goldfish have also been modified both in shape and colour http://40.media.tumblr.com/ef8838366e4b7a51646b74b5330238e3/tumblr_mi60i8S52c1rmp9qqo1_1280.jpg


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honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos) waterlocust (Gleditsia aquatica) Texas redbud (Cercis reniformis) Kentucky Coffee Tree (Gymnocladius dioica) A simple Google search will probably turn up many more examples.


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@theforestecologist is right, there are very few anatomical synapomorphies (shared derived traits) if any of Afrotheria, and the few there are almost all exhibit homoplasy. But if you want obscure putative anatomical synapomorphies that may not strictly hold: " presence of a naviculocalcaneal facet scattered vomeronasal organ blood vessels, placement of the ...


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Aside from the fact that identical twins have the same gender and thus cannot reproduce, even if we ignored that issue the offspring would not necessarily be identical to their parents, because people are diploid (have two copies of each gene) and meiosis shuffles genes up somewhat. So for example if the twins are heterozygous for a gene (their two copies ...


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This process is refereed to as Metamorphosis, is a biological process by which an animal physically develops. Furthermore, Animals can be divided into species that undergo complete metamorphosis ("holometaboly"), incomplete metamorphosis ("hemimetaboly"), or no metamorphosis ("ametaboly"). Otherwise there is the process known as ...


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The stages are called instars: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instar It changes depending on the insect: it can be caterpillar, grub, maggot, 2nd instar, 3rd instar, larval stage, larva, eruciform, scarabaeiform, campodeiform. Here are some pages: https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef017


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Anytime you see this being used in terms of a range... the numbers outside the parentheses represent the normal or expected range, and the numbers inside the parentheses represent atypical extensions beyond the normal range that are uncommon but possible and recorded. Radford, Ahles, and Bell's 1968 flora, Manual of the Vascular Flora of the Carolinas ...


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